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Turkey seeks more EU funds for refugees’ upkeep

54 injured as Lebanese security forces and Hezbollah supporters clash in central Beirut BEIRUT: Security forces fired tear gas and rubber bullets at Lebanese protesters in central Beirut on Saturday in clashes that went on into the night and wounded dozens of people. Among the badly injured were policeman after Hezbollah and Amal Movement supporters…

Turkey seeks more EU funds for refugees’ upkeep

54 injured as Lebanese security forces and Hezbollah supporters clash in central Beirut

BEIRUT: Security forces fired tear gas and rubber bullets at Lebanese protesters in central Beirut on Saturday in clashes that went on into the night and wounded dozens of people.

Among the badly injured were policeman after Hezbollah and Amal Movement supporters clashed with anti-government protesters, less than 32 hours before a key parliamentary meeting to nominate a new Lebanese leader.

Attackers threw stones and firecrackers at security forces, who responded by firing tear gas and rubber bullets.

State news agency NNA said the tear gas made several people faint. The Lebanese Civil Defense said it treated 54 people for injuries, taking more than half to hospital.

The Internal Security Forces said at least 20 police were wounded.

Riot police took more than 90 minutes to contain the attackers in areas surrounding Riad El-Solh and Martyrs squares, forcing them to retreat to the Khandak El-Ghamik and Zqaq El-Blat neighborhoods, where Hezbollah and the Amal Movement have strong support.

Clashes have become more frequent in recent weeks, with supporters of Hezbollah and Amal attacking protest camps in several cities amid counter-demonstrations.

The renewed attacks on protesters came a day after Hezbollah leader Hassan Nasrallah claimed that both the militant group and Amal “are exercising control over their supporters and that attackers do not belong to them.”

Khandak El-Ghamik residents told reporters that the attackers are not from the area.

“We do not know who they are,” one resident said.

The counter-protests have taken place in the capital and other Lebanese cities in recent weeks, prompting the leader of Hezbollah on Friday to urge his supporters — and those of Amal — to stay calm.

Following the violence, a local sheikh went to the minaret of a neighborhood mosque and called on the attackers to “go back to their homes.”

Abu Ali, an elder of the region, said that the attackers came from areas outside Beirut and infiltrated Khandak El-Ghamik before launching attacks on protesters in Riad El-Solh and Martyrs squares.

Activist Mahmoud Fakih told Arab News: “The attackers were chanting slogans showing their political affiliations. These attacks are repeated after every speech by Nasrallah. They want to spread fear in our ranks.”

The attacks coincided with plans by protesters to stage a sit-in in Nejmeh Square, near the Parliament. Activists said they wanted “to rescue the Parliament from corrupt authority.”

Security forces blocked the square to prevent protesters getting close to Parliament.

Hundreds of people had been marching in the capital as part of a historic wave of protests that has swept Lebanon since Oct. 17, furious at a ruling elite that steered the country toward its worst economic crisis in decades.

Since the protests pushed Saad Al-Hariri to resign as prime minister, talks between the main parties have been deadlocked for weeks over forming a new cabinet.

Lebanon urgently needs a new government to pull it out of the crisis. Foreign donors say they will only help after the country gets a cabinet that can enact reforms.

The unrest erupted in October from a build-up of anger at the rising cost of living, new tax plans and the record of sectarian leaders dominating the country since its 1975-90 civil war. Protesters accuse the political class of milking the state for their own benefit through networks of patronage.

Lebanon’s economic crisis, long in the making, has now come to a head: Pressure has piled on the pegged Lebanese pound. A hard currency crunch has left many importers unable to bring in goods, and banks have restricted dollar withdrawals. 

(With Reuters)

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El-Sisi reiterates need for end to foreign interference in Libya

CHICAGO: The Iranian regime has sanctioned a “campaign of hate” to fuel public animosity against the country’s Baha’i religious community, Baha’i officials told Arab News. Anthony Vance, Baha’i public affairs director in the US, said Iran has adopted laws that target its 300,000 Baha’is, barring them from universities and public sector employment, as well as…

El-Sisi reiterates need for end to foreign interference in Libya

CHICAGO: The Iranian regime has sanctioned a “campaign of hate” to fuel public animosity against the country’s Baha’i religious community, Baha’i officials told Arab News.

Anthony Vance, Baha’i public affairs director in the US, said Iran has adopted laws that target its 300,000 Baha’is, barring them from universities and public sector employment, as well as confiscating their property and arresting their leaders.

The religious group was founded in the mid-19th century in what was then Persia, and now has about 8 million followers worldwide.

More than 2 million Baha’is live in India, and there are sizable communities in the Middle East, Africa and the US.

“After the 1979 revolution, between 1979 and 1992, over 200 Baha’is were executed, killed in Iran, mostly by execution. Most were elected members of the (Baha’i) administration institutions. It’s clear that the (Iranian) regime was targeting those whom they perceived to be the leadership of the Baha’i community,” Vance said.

“Baha’is are barred from university education. They’re barred from employment in the public sector, by the government that is, or in government-owned entities. Given that the public sector makes up more than half of the Iranian economy, that’s quite a disadvantage in that society,” he added.

“There are genuine efforts to impoverish the Baha’i community. There have been confiscations of Baha’i property, several thousands since the revolution. But more recently, there have been attempts to make it a normal, legal attempt in the country. Just to illustrate, last year there were two appellate court decisions to affirm the lower court in the province of Mazid Darran that said the Baha’is were ritually unclean and don’t have any right to own property.”

Vance said persecution by Iran “is quite systematic” and has prevented the Baha’i community from growing in recent years.

The Baha’is are the largest non-Muslim religious minority in Iran. The religion’s principle founder, a merchant who adopted the name Bab (“The Gate“), was executed in 1850 after he began preaching that another prophet similar to Jesus and Mohammed would appear. Persecution increased under the ayatollahs following the 1979 revolution.

Vance said Baha’is respect and recognize the importance of the Christian and Muslim traditions, and it is a monotheistic religion.

Persecution of Baha’is by Iran was the focus of a resolution introduced on Oct. 25 in the US House of Representatives, which condemned Tehran’s state-sponsored persecution of the community. There are more than 180,000 Baha’is in the US, Vance said.

The resolution called on Tehran to immediately release imprisoned or detained Baha’is and all other prisoners held solely on account of their religion; to end the campaign of hate propaganda against the Baha’is; and to reverse state-imposed policies denying them and members of other religious minorities equal opportunities to higher education, earning a livelihood, due process under the law, and the free exercise of religious practices.

It also calls on US President Joe Biden and Secretary of State Antony Blinken to condemn the Iranian regime’s continued violation of human rights and demand the immediate release of prisoners held solely on account of their religion.

The resolution, introduced by Florida Democrat Ted Deutch and supported by a bipartisan group, also calls for sanctions on Iranian regime officials over human rights abuses against the Baha’i community.

Vance praised support from the governments of Bahrain, the UAE and Saudi Arabia, where there are small Baha’i populations.

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220,000 visitors at Egypt’s pavilion at Expo 2020 Dubai since its opening

DUBAI: The Muslim World League has launched an exhibition on the lives of the prophets at its Expo 2020 Dubai pavilion. “The Prophets As If You See Them” uses the latest technology to present the biographies of Islam’s prophets and messengers. It sheds light on the messages of peace, love, affection, tolerance, coexistence, and humanity…

220,000 visitors at Egypt’s pavilion at Expo 2020 Dubai since its opening

DUBAI: The Muslim World League has launched an exhibition on the lives of the prophets at its Expo 2020 Dubai pavilion.

“The Prophets As If You See Them” uses the latest technology to present the biographies of Islam’s prophets and messengers.

It sheds light on the messages of peace, love, affection, tolerance, coexistence, and humanity that they brought to the world.

It also highlights the noble morals of Prophet Muhammad and the comprehensiveness and beauty of Islam’s global message.

The 25 prophets and messengers mentioned in the Qur’an will be introduced in five different languages: Arabic, English, French, Hebrew, and Indonesian.

Visitors can learn about the prophets’ titles, nicknames, characteristics, morals, childhoods, relatives, the books that were revealed to them, the miracles they performed, and the languages they spoke.

The exhibition employs digital technology in different languages to transport visitors to another world, providing a cinematic experience enhanced by LED screens that take visitors to the heart of the action, as if they were accompanying the prophets through their lives.

It includes a campaign called “Islam is a Religion of Peace” and focuses on the humanitarian behavior of the prophets, especially Prophet Muhammad.

An interactive LED wall – “Your Message to Humanity” – is aimed at removing racial divides, overcoming negative cultural conflicts, and deepening the concept of people’s right to live in dignity and freedom, emphasizing the importance of coexistence.

Visitors can leave a video message that will be part of an interactive mural. It will bear the signatures of visitors and messages of love, tolerance, and acceptance of others.

The second floor of the MWL pavilion contains models of Makkah and Madinah, among other exhibits.

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Egypt to host Food Africa starting Dec. 12

DUBAI: The Muslim World League has launched an exhibition on the lives of the prophets at its Expo 2020 Dubai pavilion. “The Prophets As If You See Them” uses the latest technology to present the biographies of Islam’s prophets and messengers. It sheds light on the messages of peace, love, affection, tolerance, coexistence, and humanity…

Egypt to host Food Africa starting Dec. 12

DUBAI: The Muslim World League has launched an exhibition on the lives of the prophets at its Expo 2020 Dubai pavilion.

“The Prophets As If You See Them” uses the latest technology to present the biographies of Islam’s prophets and messengers.

It sheds light on the messages of peace, love, affection, tolerance, coexistence, and humanity that they brought to the world.

It also highlights the noble morals of Prophet Muhammad and the comprehensiveness and beauty of Islam’s global message.

The 25 prophets and messengers mentioned in the Qur’an will be introduced in five different languages: Arabic, English, French, Hebrew, and Indonesian.

Visitors can learn about the prophets’ titles, nicknames, characteristics, morals, childhoods, relatives, the books that were revealed to them, the miracles they performed, and the languages they spoke.

The exhibition employs digital technology in different languages to transport visitors to another world, providing a cinematic experience enhanced by LED screens that take visitors to the heart of the action, as if they were accompanying the prophets through their lives.

It includes a campaign called “Islam is a Religion of Peace” and focuses on the humanitarian behavior of the prophets, especially Prophet Muhammad.

An interactive LED wall – “Your Message to Humanity” – is aimed at removing racial divides, overcoming negative cultural conflicts, and deepening the concept of people’s right to live in dignity and freedom, emphasizing the importance of coexistence.

Visitors can leave a video message that will be part of an interactive mural. It will bear the signatures of visitors and messages of love, tolerance, and acceptance of others.

The second floor of the MWL pavilion contains models of Makkah and Madinah, among other exhibits.

Continue Reading
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